Jessica Burrows: Hungry Bees-ness—Radiation exposure in contaminated landscapes such as the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone increases bumblebee feeding and metabolism

In this new post, Jessica Burrows—a fourth year PhD student based at the University of Stirling, Scotland—discusses her new paper ‘Ecologically relevant radiation exposure triggers elevated metabolic rate and nectar consumption in bumblebees’. Jessica’s PhD research is funded by the NERC IAPETUS doctoral training programme, and focuses on the effects of radiation levels found in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone on invertebrates. About the Paper There … Continue reading Jessica Burrows: Hungry Bees-ness—Radiation exposure in contaminated landscapes such as the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone increases bumblebee feeding and metabolism

Javiera Benavente: Scaling of metabolism and excretion along a temperature gradient

In this blog post, Dr. Javiera Benavente, who recently graduated with their PhD from the University of Auckland, discusses with their recently accepted paper, “Plasticity and evolution shape the scaling of metabolism and excretion along a geothermal temperature gradient.” About the paper In this paper, we investigated how phenotypic plasticity and contemporary evolutionary adaptation can shape how the size- and temperature-dependence of metabolic and excretion … Continue reading Javiera Benavente: Scaling of metabolism and excretion along a temperature gradient

Luke Wilde

Mountains, mice and the impacts of infection

In this Insight, Luke Wilde talks about his new paper, varying costs of infection, extreme environments and taking a metabolic lab in to the field.

Specifically, we showed that the effects of an infection can be greatly heightened if the host exists in a consistently stressful environment, and if the investigators use current, relevant metrics of performance and fitness.

Continue reading “Mountains, mice and the impacts of infection”