Yingying Wang

Moving Ecology: Yingying Wang

In this series we share the experiences of ‘globetrotters’ in ecological sciences, who have traveled all over the world during their research career. Dr. Yingying Wang, the current Haldane prize winner, writes about her academic journey from China for her M.S., to the Netherlands for her Ph.D., and finally to Finland for her postdoctoral research.

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“Both groups are picking the flowers when they’re feeding – they’re walking about and you can see them pick flower after flower after flower after flower.” Jurene Kemp talks to Ken Thompson in our new podcast!

Find our podcasts on apple, spotify and stitcher, or your favourite podcast app. “It seems that both groups are picking the flowers when they’re feeding – they’re walking about and you can see them pick flower after flower after flower after flower.” In this podcast, Jurene Kemp talks about her paper, Cryptic petal coloration decreases floral apparency and herbivory in nocturnally closing daisies – recently … Continue reading “Both groups are picking the flowers when they’re feeding – they’re walking about and you can see them pick flower after flower after flower after flower.” Jurene Kemp talks to Ken Thompson in our new podcast!

Abby Kimmitt hold a female resident junco at her field site near University of Virginia’s Mountain Lake Biological Station in Pembroke, VA. Photo Credit: Kaitlin Alford.

Abigail Kimmitt – Seasonal sympatry and timing of reproduction in dark-eyed juncos.

Abby Kimmitt hold a female resident junco at her field site near University of Virginia’s Mountain Lake Biological Station in Pembroke, VA. Photo Credit: Kaitlin Alford.
Abby Kimmitt hold a female resident junco at her field site near University of Virginia’s Mountain Lake Biological Station in Pembroke, VA. Photo Credit: Kaitlin Alford.

Dr. Abigail Kimmitt, a postdoctoral researcher at Texas A&M University, tells us about her paper “Migratory strategy explains differences in timing of female reproductive development in seasonally sympatric songbirds”, as well as her current projects and her journey in becoming an ecologist.

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Erin Sauer: toads, fevers and finding ecology

Dr Erin Sauer in Iceland (with puffin.)
Dr Erin Sauer in Iceland (with puffin.)

Dr. Erin L. Sauer is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Wisconsin – Madison in the Forest and Wildlife Ecology Department. Her research focuses on understanding how environmental pressures and animal behaviour shape host-parasite interactions, and she recently published a paper showing that behavioural fever reduces ranaviral infection in toads

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Marie-Caroline Prima: Empirically testing the robustness of a spatial network following habitat loss and fragmentation

Marie-Carolina Prima

In this insight, Dr. Marie-Caroline Prima discusses the paper, “A landscape experiment of spatial network robustness and space-use reorganisation following habitat fragmentation”, possible new research questions, and her involvement in ecology.

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Stefano Mammola doing fieldwork in a cave. Photo by courtesy of Francesco Tomasinelli (http://www.isopoda.net/).

Stefano Mammola: Revisiting Janzen’s hypothesis using cave-dwelling spiders

In this insight, Dr. Stefano Mammola discusses his paper “Extending Janzen’s hypothesis to temperate regions: a test using subterranean ecosystems” as well his experience as a subterranean ecologist. What’s your paper about? This paper is about testing the underlying assumption of Janzen’s hypothesis in caves. Published in 1967 under the evocative title “Why Mountain Passes are Higher in the Tropics”, Janzen’s hypothesis is an important … Continue reading Stefano Mammola: Revisiting Janzen’s hypothesis using cave-dwelling spiders

Alex Strauss: disease, diversity and dilution

Dr Alex Strauss  is a Postdoctoral Research Assistant at the University of Minnesota and winner of the 2018 Haldane Prize for Early Career Researchers for his paper, Linking host traits, interactions with competitors and disease: Mechanistic foundations for disease dilution.

In this Insight, he talks about the background behind his paper, digs into disease, dilution and biodiversity, and what he wants to see happen next in this area.

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Insight: Andrew Durso

Andrew Durso

Dr Andrew Durso is a Postdoctoral Research Assistant at the University of Geneva, Switzerland. He was recently shortlisted for Functional Ecology’s Haldane Prize for Early Career Researchers for his paper, Stable isotope tracers reveal a trade‐off between reproduction and immunity in a reptile with competing needs

In this Insight, he talks about how he got into ecology and what he’s been working on since then.

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