Chen Ye: Active revegetation does not impact nitrogen removal efficiency in a riparian zone

In this new post, Dr. Chen Ye—a Professor of Ecology at Wuhan Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China—discusses her recently accepted paper, “Soil denitrification rates are more sensitive to hydrological changes than restoration approaches in a unique riparian zone”. About the paper The riparian zone is defined as the aquatic-terrestrial interface. This zone can improve water quality by removing nitrogen via denitrification processes. The … Continue reading Chen Ye: Active revegetation does not impact nitrogen removal efficiency in a riparian zone

David Bartholomew: Revealing the niche of the world’s tallest tropical trees

In this new post, David Bartholomew presents his last work ‘Differential nutrient limitation and tree height control leaf physiology, supporting niche partitioning in tropical dipterocarp forests’, shares the difficulties of working in tropical forests and invites everyone to help any ecologists seeking for help. About the paper In the rainforests of north Borneo in South-East Asia exist the world’s tallest tropical trees. These are the … Continue reading David Bartholomew: Revealing the niche of the world’s tallest tropical trees

Jessica Burrows: Hungry Bees-ness—Radiation exposure in contaminated landscapes such as the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone increases bumblebee feeding and metabolism

In this new post, Jessica Burrows—a fourth year PhD student based at the University of Stirling, Scotland—discusses her new paper ‘Ecologically relevant radiation exposure triggers elevated metabolic rate and nectar consumption in bumblebees’. Jessica’s PhD research is funded by the NERC IAPETUS doctoral training programme, and focuses on the effects of radiation levels found in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone on invertebrates. About the Paper There … Continue reading Jessica Burrows: Hungry Bees-ness—Radiation exposure in contaminated landscapes such as the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone increases bumblebee feeding and metabolism

How do rapid shifts in body size influence population dynamics?

In this new post, Dr. Jean-Philippe Gibert, an Assistant Professor of Biology at Duke University, USA, discusses with us his recently accepted paper, “Feedbacks between size and density determine rapid eco-phenotypic dynamics.” About the paper This paper was born out of serendipity and was a true team effort. Our goal was to quantify possible changes in protist traits over a short period of time as … Continue reading How do rapid shifts in body size influence population dynamics?

Eli Bendall: Not so tall (tree) tales from the glasshouse

In this new post, Eli Bendall from Western Sydney University presents his last paper ‘Growth enhancements of elevated atmospheric [CO2] are reduced under drought-like conditions in temperate eucalypts’. He discusses the interacting impact of CO2 rise and drought for woody plants, highlights why sunny days can be problematic for ecologists, and shares his unconditional love for eucalyptus. About the paper Our work investigated the interacting … Continue reading Eli Bendall: Not so tall (tree) tales from the glasshouse

Régis Céréghino: Functional redundancy is an insurance against the effects of precipitation change on Neotropical invertebrate communities

In this new post, Professor Régis Céréghino, from University Paul Sabatier (Toulouse, France), presents his paper ‘Functional redundancy dampens precipitation change impacts on species-rich invertebrate communities across the Neotropics’, discusses the importance of collaboration for answering general ecological questions and highlights the necessity to know your study system. About the paper The aim of this study was to understand how biogeographic contexts influence invertebrate community … Continue reading Régis Céréghino: Functional redundancy is an insurance against the effects of precipitation change on Neotropical invertebrate communities

Haldane 2021 Winner Max Mallen-Cooper: Tiny plants with big nutrient dreams

We are delighted to announce that the winner of the Haldane Prize 2021 for early career researchers has been awarded to Max Mallen-Cooper. Check out their story behind the award winning paper below and read all the shortlisted papers here. Winner of the Haldane Prize 2021, Max Mallen-Cooper from the University of New South Wales discusses their latest research: Tissue chemistry of biocrust species along … Continue reading Haldane 2021 Winner Max Mallen-Cooper: Tiny plants with big nutrient dreams

Alex Austin: You get what you’re given? Solitary bee larvae demonstrate the ability to regulate their nutritional intake

In this new post, Alexander Austin, a new ecological researcher working at Ku-ring-gai Council, Sydney, Australia, shares their paper: Solitary bee larvae prioritize carbohydrate over protein in parentally provided pollen—recently shortlisted for the Haldane Prize for Early Career Researchers. About the paper Nutrition is linked to almost every aspect of an animal’s behaviour and physiology, and we really wanted to explore this in solitary bees. … Continue reading Alex Austin: You get what you’re given? Solitary bee larvae demonstrate the ability to regulate their nutritional intake

Carl G. Lundblad: Understanding the evolutionary causes of variation in an overlooked life-history trait, incubation period.

In this new post, Carl G. Lundblad, a new ecological researcher working at Oregon State University, ORE, USA, shares his paper: Intraspecific variation in incubation behaviours along a latitudinal gradient is driven by nest microclimate and selection on neonate quality—recently shortlisted for the Haldane Prize for Early Career Researchers. Like many wildlife ecologists, I was drawn to the field through a lifelong fascination with the … Continue reading Carl G. Lundblad: Understanding the evolutionary causes of variation in an overlooked life-history trait, incubation period.

Randall W. Long: Spenders and savers—Intraspecific support for plant economic theory

In this new post, Randall Long, a new ecological researcher working at the University of California-Santa Barbara, USA, shares his paper: Spenders versus savers: Climate-induced carbon allocation trade-offs in a recently introduced woody plant—recently shortlisted for the Haldane Prize for Early Career Researchers. About the paper As ecologists we assume that trade-offs exist in organisms when limited resources are allocated to multiple competing demands. In … Continue reading Randall W. Long: Spenders and savers—Intraspecific support for plant economic theory