Mario Blanco-Sánchez: Natural selection consistently favours an acquisitive resource-use strategy in Mediterranean semiarid plants

In this new post, Mario Blanco-Sánchez, Ph.D student at University Rey Juan Carlos, Spain, presents his latest publication ‘Natural selection favours drought escape and an acquisitive resource-use strategy in semiarid Mediterranean shrubs’. He discusses how he dealt with a striking result and encourages young ecologists to pursue their own interests in the field! A Spanish translation of this blogpost is available to read here! About … Continue reading Mario Blanco-Sánchez: Natural selection consistently favours an acquisitive resource-use strategy in Mediterranean semiarid plants

Mario Blanco-Sánchez: La selección natural favorece de manera consistente a las plantas con una estrategia adquisitiva de recursos en el semiárido mediterráneo

En esta nueva publicación, Mario Blanco-Sánchez, estudiante de doctorado en la Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, España, presenta su última publicación ‘La selección natural favorece el escape de la sequía y una estrategia adquisitiva de uso de recursos en arbustos mediterráneos semiáridos‘. Habla de cómo lidió con un resultado sorprendente y alienta a los jóvenes ecologistas a perseguir sus propios intereses en el campo. Una traducción … Continue reading Mario Blanco-Sánchez: La selección natural favorece de manera consistente a las plantas con una estrategia adquisitiva de recursos en el semiárido mediterráneo

Simon Haberstroh: Cork oaks under shrub invasion behave differently 

In this new post, Simon Haberstroh from Freiburg University, Germany, presents his latest work ‘Plant invasion modifies isohydricity in Mediterranean tree species’. He discusses the capacity of plants to regulate their hydraulic strategies and remembers his long survey nights in Portuguese oak forests.  About the paper  Our publication in Functional Ecology deals with plant hydraulic strategies, i.e. how plants regulate their water consumption during different … Continue reading Simon Haberstroh: Cork oaks under shrub invasion behave differently 

Matthew Lattanzio: UV behavioral regulation in eastern fence lizards

In this new post, Dr. Matthew Lattanzio—an Assistant Professor in the Organismal and Environmental Biology Department at Christopher Newport University, USA—discusses his recently accepted paper, “Active regulation of ultraviolet light exposure overrides thermal preference behavior in eastern fence lizards“ About the paper Imagine for a moment you’re outside in a park, on a warm sunny day, enjoying a hike or just a relaxing break outside. … Continue reading Matthew Lattanzio: UV behavioral regulation in eastern fence lizards

Benjamin Mueller: Bringing light into the dark – Night-DOM release by turf algae

In this new post, Benjamin Mueller, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and the University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA, discusses his recently accepted paper, “Nocturnal dissolved organic matter release by turf algae and its role in the microbialization of reefs,” and warns against discarding results that go against expectations. About the paper Our paper sheds light on the role of … Continue reading Benjamin Mueller: Bringing light into the dark – Night-DOM release by turf algae

Chen Ye: Active revegetation does not impact nitrogen removal efficiency in a riparian zone

In this new post, Dr. Chen Ye—a Professor of Ecology at Wuhan Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China—discusses her recently accepted paper, “Soil denitrification rates are more sensitive to hydrological changes than restoration approaches in a unique riparian zone”. About the paper The riparian zone is defined as the aquatic-terrestrial interface. This zone can improve water quality by removing nitrogen via denitrification processes. The … Continue reading Chen Ye: Active revegetation does not impact nitrogen removal efficiency in a riparian zone

David Bartholomew: Revealing the niche of the world’s tallest tropical trees

In this new post, David Bartholomew presents his last work ‘Differential nutrient limitation and tree height control leaf physiology, supporting niche partitioning in tropical dipterocarp forests’, shares the difficulties of working in tropical forests and invites everyone to help any ecologists seeking for help. About the paper In the rainforests of north Borneo in South-East Asia exist the world’s tallest tropical trees. These are the … Continue reading David Bartholomew: Revealing the niche of the world’s tallest tropical trees

Jessica Burrows: Hungry Bees-ness—Radiation exposure in contaminated landscapes such as the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone increases bumblebee feeding and metabolism

In this new post, Jessica Burrows—a fourth year PhD student based at the University of Stirling, Scotland—discusses her new paper ‘Ecologically relevant radiation exposure triggers elevated metabolic rate and nectar consumption in bumblebees’. Jessica’s PhD research is funded by the NERC IAPETUS doctoral training programme, and focuses on the effects of radiation levels found in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone on invertebrates. About the Paper There … Continue reading Jessica Burrows: Hungry Bees-ness—Radiation exposure in contaminated landscapes such as the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone increases bumblebee feeding and metabolism

How do rapid shifts in body size influence population dynamics?

In this new post, Dr. Jean-Philippe Gibert, an Assistant Professor of Biology at Duke University, USA, discusses with us his recently accepted paper, “Feedbacks between size and density determine rapid eco-phenotypic dynamics.” About the paper This paper was born out of serendipity and was a true team effort. Our goal was to quantify possible changes in protist traits over a short period of time as … Continue reading How do rapid shifts in body size influence population dynamics?

Eli Bendall: Not so tall (tree) tales from the glasshouse

In this new post, Eli Bendall from Western Sydney University presents his last paper ‘Growth enhancements of elevated atmospheric [CO2] are reduced under drought-like conditions in temperate eucalypts’. He discusses the interacting impact of CO2 rise and drought for woody plants, highlights why sunny days can be problematic for ecologists, and shares his unconditional love for eucalyptus. About the paper Our work investigated the interacting … Continue reading Eli Bendall: Not so tall (tree) tales from the glasshouse