Pieter Arnold: How an alpine plant species responds to temperature stress depends on the type of trait and life stage

In this new post, Pieter Arnold, Research Fellow at The Australian National University (ANU), presents his latest work ‘Patterns of phenotypic plasticity along a thermal gradient differ by trait type in an alpine plant’. Pieter discusses the challenges of his group’s experimental design, highlights the importance of looking at plants along their entire life cycle, and also advises everyone to expand their horizons when looking … Continue reading Pieter Arnold: How an alpine plant species responds to temperature stress depends on the type of trait and life stage

Mario Blanco-Sánchez: Natural selection consistently favours an acquisitive resource-use strategy in Mediterranean semiarid plants

In this new post, Mario Blanco-Sánchez, Ph.D student at University Rey Juan Carlos, Spain, presents his latest publication ‘Natural selection favours drought escape and an acquisitive resource-use strategy in semiarid Mediterranean shrubs’. He discusses how he dealt with a striking result and encourages young ecologists to pursue their own interests in the field! A Spanish translation of this blogpost is available to read here! About … Continue reading Mario Blanco-Sánchez: Natural selection consistently favours an acquisitive resource-use strategy in Mediterranean semiarid plants

Mario Blanco-Sánchez: La selección natural favorece de manera consistente a las plantas con una estrategia adquisitiva de recursos en el semiárido mediterráneo

En esta nueva publicación, Mario Blanco-Sánchez, estudiante de doctorado en la Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, España, presenta su última publicación ‘La selección natural favorece el escape de la sequía y una estrategia adquisitiva de uso de recursos en arbustos mediterráneos semiáridos‘. Habla de cómo lidió con un resultado sorprendente y alienta a los jóvenes ecologistas a perseguir sus propios intereses en el campo. Una traducción … Continue reading Mario Blanco-Sánchez: La selección natural favorece de manera consistente a las plantas con una estrategia adquisitiva de recursos en el semiárido mediterráneo

Matthew Lattanzio: UV behavioral regulation in eastern fence lizards

In this new post, Dr. Matthew Lattanzio—an Assistant Professor in the Organismal and Environmental Biology Department at Christopher Newport University, USA—discusses his recently accepted paper, “Active regulation of ultraviolet light exposure overrides thermal preference behavior in eastern fence lizards“ About the paper Imagine for a moment you’re outside in a park, on a warm sunny day, enjoying a hike or just a relaxing break outside. … Continue reading Matthew Lattanzio: UV behavioral regulation in eastern fence lizards

Benjamin Mueller: Bringing light into the dark – Night-DOM release by turf algae

In this new post, Benjamin Mueller, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and the University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA, discusses his recently accepted paper, “Nocturnal dissolved organic matter release by turf algae and its role in the microbialization of reefs,” and warns against discarding results that go against expectations. About the paper Our paper sheds light on the role of … Continue reading Benjamin Mueller: Bringing light into the dark – Night-DOM release by turf algae

Chen Ye: Active revegetation does not impact nitrogen removal efficiency in a riparian zone

In this new post, Dr. Chen Ye—a Professor of Ecology at Wuhan Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China—discusses her recently accepted paper, “Soil denitrification rates are more sensitive to hydrological changes than restoration approaches in a unique riparian zone”. About the paper The riparian zone is defined as the aquatic-terrestrial interface. This zone can improve water quality by removing nitrogen via denitrification processes. The … Continue reading Chen Ye: Active revegetation does not impact nitrogen removal efficiency in a riparian zone

Simulated winter warming negatively impacts survival of Antarctica’s only endemic insect: Podcast Transcript

In this podcast for Functional Ecology, Assistant Editor, Frank Harris, sits down with Jack J. Devlin—an early career researcher from the University of Kentucky—to discuss his recently published paper ‘Simulated winter warming negatively impacts survival of Antarctica’s only endemic insect.’ With warmer winters expected to become more common with climate change, this study’s results indicate that winter warming could negatively impact cold-adapted insects like the … Continue reading Simulated winter warming negatively impacts survival of Antarctica’s only endemic insect: Podcast Transcript

David Bartholomew: Revealing the niche of the world’s tallest tropical trees

In this new post, David Bartholomew presents his last work ‘Differential nutrient limitation and tree height control leaf physiology, supporting niche partitioning in tropical dipterocarp forests’, shares the difficulties of working in tropical forests and invites everyone to help any ecologists seeking for help. About the paper In the rainforests of north Borneo in South-East Asia exist the world’s tallest tropical trees. These are the … Continue reading David Bartholomew: Revealing the niche of the world’s tallest tropical trees

Emerging relationships among microbes, soil carbon storage and climate change: Podcast transcript

In this podcast for Functional Ecology, Assistant Editor, Frank Harris, sits down with two Guest Editors—Pablo García-Palacios and Ji Chen— to discuss our recently published Special Feature on soil carbon storage. The Special Feature identifies emerging findings from soil microbial ecology and climate change research that can be used to reduce uncertainty if incorporated into theory and models. Frank: Today, I have Pablo García-Palacios and … Continue reading Emerging relationships among microbes, soil carbon storage and climate change: Podcast transcript

Numair Masud: People of Colour

To celebrate UK Pride Month, the British Ecological Society journals have re-launched ‘Rainbow Research’ – a blog series which aims to promote the visibility of STEM researchers from the LGBTQ+ community by connecting each post to a theme represented by one of the colours shown in the Progress Pride flag. In this new post, Numair Masud, a Senior Research Technician from Cardiff University, UK, discusses … Continue reading Numair Masud: People of Colour