Mark Wilber

Mark Wilber: Resistance and tolerance of salamanders to an emerging fungal pathogen

Dr. Mark Wilber, Assistant Professor in the Department of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries at the University of Tennessee, discusses his recently accepted article, “Putative resistance and tolerance mechanisms have little impact on disease progression for an emerging salamander pathogen”, describes his favourite part about being ecologist, and how he got into the field. What is the background behind your paper? Hosts can defend themselves against … Continue reading Mark Wilber: Resistance and tolerance of salamanders to an emerging fungal pathogen

Collecting ticks from the vegetation using the flagging method (© University of Leipzig).

Land-use, biodiversity and zoonotic diseases

Public awareness and perception of zoonoses has dramatically increased in the last few months due to COVID-19. We invited Drs. Christian Imholt and Anna Obiegala, expert disease ecologists, to explain their perspectives on the emergence of zoonotic diseases in the context of human interference and habitat disturbance.

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Erin Sauer: toads, fevers and finding ecology

Dr Erin Sauer in Iceland (with puffin.)
Dr Erin Sauer in Iceland (with puffin.)

Dr. Erin L. Sauer is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Wisconsin – Madison in the Forest and Wildlife Ecology Department. Her research focuses on understanding how environmental pressures and animal behaviour shape host-parasite interactions, and she recently published a paper showing that behavioural fever reduces ranaviral infection in toads

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Luke Wilde

Mountains, mice and the impacts of infection

In this Insight, Luke Wilde talks about his new paper, varying costs of infection, extreme environments and taking a metabolic lab in to the field.

Specifically, we showed that the effects of an infection can be greatly heightened if the host exists in a consistently stressful environment, and if the investigators use current, relevant metrics of performance and fitness.

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