Black History Month 2022: Contribute to our BHM Blog Series!

“Black History Month is a time to celebrate black history, heritage and culture, and the iconic figures that have contributed so much, but this year, let’s make it about so much more. If you’re serious about allyship, it’s Time for Change: Action Not Words.” – Catherine Ross, Black History Month Editor. This year, the autumn issue of our membership magazine, The Niche, was taken over … Continue reading Black History Month 2022: Contribute to our BHM Blog Series!

Jackson Creek, one of the 11 streams I study in south-central Ontario, Canada. © Bianca Nucaro-Viteri from 705 Creative

Sandra Klemet-N’Guessan: Am I a Black ecologist?

Jackson Creek, one of the 11 streams I study in south-central Ontario, Canada. © Bianca Nucaro-Viteri from 705 Creative
Jackson Creek, one of the 11 streams I study in south-central Ontario, Canada. © Bianca Nucaro-Viteri from 705 Creative

For Black History Month, the British Ecological Society (BES) journals are celebrating the work of Black ecologists from around the world and sharing their stories. This post is from Sandra Klemet-N’Guessan, (@SandraKlemet) a PhD candidate in the Xenopoulos lab, Trent University, Canada, where she studies the role that aquatic animals play in the cycling of nutrients in lakes and streams.

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This photo was taken on a field trip I took with Dr. Kristin Winchell in the Dominican Republic at the Jardín Botánico Nacional Dr. Rafael M. Moscoso.

Jhan Salazar: Journeys of an Afro-Colombian Ecologist

For Black History Month, the British Ecological Society (BES) journals are celebrating the work of Black ecologists from around the world and sharing their stories. This post is from Jhan Salazar, a PhD student at Washington University.

Hi, I’m Jhan! I’m an Afro-Colombian ecologist, and I’m a PhD student in Jonathan Losos’ Lab at Washington University in St Louis. My research is focused on exploring the effect that temperature and climate have on the ecology and evolution of tropical lizards. I was born in Puerto Tejada, Cauca (Colombia), and unlike many of my peers, the story of why I became an ecologist and evolutionary biologist started long before I went to university or even to school. When I was five years old, I went to the most beautiful place I have ever been: my parents and grandparents’ hometown. In this small town called Boca de Patía, which is also in the Cauca region, I saw for the first time a forest – a tropical rainforest – and met many of its unique inhabitants: snakes, poison dart frogs, and many other fantastic animals and plants. After being there I started watching as many nature documentaries as I could, which made me wonder why none of the scientists on these documentaries looked like me. 

This photo was taken on a field trip I took with Dr. Kristin Winchell in the Dominican Republic at the Jardín Botánico Nacional Dr. Rafael M. Moscoso.
This photo was taken on a field trip I took with Dr. Kristin Winchell in the Dominican Republic at the Jardín Botánico Nacional Dr. Rafael M. Moscoso.
Continue reading “Jhan Salazar: Journeys of an Afro-Colombian Ecologist”