Jessica Burrows: Hungry Bees-ness—Radiation exposure in contaminated landscapes such as the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone increases bumblebee feeding and metabolism

In this new post, Jessica Burrows—a fourth year PhD student based at the University of Stirling, Scotland—discusses her new paper ‘Ecologically relevant radiation exposure triggers elevated metabolic rate and nectar consumption in bumblebees’. Jessica’s PhD research is funded by the NERC IAPETUS doctoral training programme, and focuses on the effects of radiation levels found in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone on invertebrates. About the Paper There … Continue reading Jessica Burrows: Hungry Bees-ness—Radiation exposure in contaminated landscapes such as the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone increases bumblebee feeding and metabolism

Alex Austin: You get what you’re given? Solitary bee larvae demonstrate the ability to regulate their nutritional intake

In this new post, Alexander Austin, a new ecological researcher working at Ku-ring-gai Council, Sydney, Australia, shares their paper: Solitary bee larvae prioritize carbohydrate over protein in parentally provided pollen—recently shortlisted for the Haldane Prize for Early Career Researchers. About the paper Nutrition is linked to almost every aspect of an animal’s behaviour and physiology, and we really wanted to explore this in solitary bees. … Continue reading Alex Austin: You get what you’re given? Solitary bee larvae demonstrate the ability to regulate their nutritional intake

World bee day 2021: bee research collection

The 20th May marks world bee day, an opportunity for all of us to appreciate these little creatures that make our modern food economy possible. Bees are extremely valuable as pollinators and ecosystem services, but they are also fascinating creatures in their own right with complex social structures and communication methods. Here, we’ve curated our favourite bee-based research from Functional Ecology, as well as some … Continue reading World bee day 2021: bee research collection