Jessica Burrows: Hungry Bees-ness—Radiation exposure in contaminated landscapes such as the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone increases bumblebee feeding and metabolism

In this new post, Jessica Burrows—a fourth year PhD student based at the University of Stirling, Scotland—discusses her new paper ‘Ecologically relevant radiation exposure triggers elevated metabolic rate and nectar consumption in bumblebees’. Jessica’s PhD research is funded by the NERC IAPETUS doctoral training programme, and focuses on the effects of radiation levels found in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone on invertebrates. About the Paper There … Continue reading Jessica Burrows: Hungry Bees-ness—Radiation exposure in contaminated landscapes such as the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone increases bumblebee feeding and metabolism

Ellen Chenoweth uses a prey mapping robot to measure the distribution of hatchery salmon after a release at Hidden Falls Hatchery in Alaska.

Ellen Chenoweth: salmon hatcheries are not the best buffet for Baleen whales

In our latest post, Ellen Chenoweth from University of Alaska Fairbanks introduces her work ‘Confronting assumptions about prey selection by lunge-feeding whales using a process-based model’, discusses how the apparently easiest foraging strategy is not always the optimal and presents the diverse set of project she and her colleagues are currently running. About the Research Baleen whales are generalist and innovative predators. They grow to … Continue reading Ellen Chenoweth: salmon hatcheries are not the best buffet for Baleen whales

Julie Marie van der Hoop: foraging amongst old data with the whales

Julie Marie van der Hoop has just finished up a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Postdoctoral Research Fellowship with the Marine Bioacoustics Lab at Aarhus University. In this Insight, she talks about her work on Foraging rates of ram-filtering North Atlantic right whales. In this paper, the authors used multi-sensor bio-logging tags to ask the questions: How much prey-laden water is filtered by right whales over the course … Continue reading Julie Marie van der Hoop: foraging amongst old data with the whales